Why Buy Made in USA? / Part 6

Why Buy Made in USA? Imports of nondurables continue to grow year over year in many categories (Bureau of Economic Analysis, 2015). America imported $126 billion in 2011, $127 billion in 2012, and $132 billion in 2013 in apparel, footwear, and household goods alone (Bureau of Economic Analysis, 2015). Toiletries and cosmetics were another popular import, which grew from $7.9 billion in 2011, to $8.7 billion in 2012, to approximately $9.6 billion in 2013 (Bureau of Economic Analysis, 2015). Likewise, food and beverage imports rose from $108 billion in 2011, to $111 billion in 2012, to $116 billion in 2013 (Bureau of Economic Analysis, 2015). Though down slightly from 2011 and 2012, imports of pharmaceuticals and medicines totaled $84 billion in 2013 (Bureau of Economic Analysis, 2015). While still disproportionately high compared to exports, one promising trend is a decrease in imported energy products including gas and oil; $488 billion dollars worth was imported in 2011, $454 billion in 2012, and $410 in 2013 (Bureau of Economic Analysis, 2015). Imports of all other remaining nondurable items rose from $18.5 billion in 2011, to $18.8 billion in 2012, to $19.4 billion in 2013 (Bureau of Economic Analysis, 2015). Despite such a profound dependence on foreign countries for nondurable goods like apparel, new policies like the Revitalize American Manufacturing Act virtually ignore the trend, and instead push for the advancement of manufacturing technologies in areas like: nanotechnology, advanced ceramics, photonics, optics, composites, bio-based materials, hybrid technologies, and tool development for microelectronics (Bureau of Economic Analysis, 2015; U.S. Congress, 2015). Even though innovation in these areas is also much needed, it appears that these new initiatives are primarily centered on the advancement of manufacturing for durable industries like transportation, defense, and high-tech (U.S. Congress, 2015). Similarly, the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation provides very few resources to support more low-tech industries like food, beverage, and apparel manufacturing (NNMI, 2015).

Team MAINLINE